Best Blender for Making Flour (After Years of Experience)

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Looking for the best blender for making flour? You're in the right place! We've been using blenders for almost a decade now and own all the major brands. Needless to say, we've made many different types of flour in the process.

BEST BLENDER FOR MAKING FLOUR

In this guide, expect to find...

  • Our top picks for blenders to make flour (almond flour, rice flour, seed flour and more).
  • Why we picked all of them.
  • The pros and cons of each of our picks.

Best Blender for Flour Options

In a hurry? Here's our top picks...

The Vitamix 5300 is our #1 pick for making flour for a few reasons.

For one, it's comes with the wide 64 oz Vitamix container which is excellent at creating that crushing vortex. This is mainly because of the longer blades and wider surface area at the top. It can do a great job without it, but you can also opt to get the grain jar down the line if you want to get the absolute best performance for flour.

With it's 3-Peak HP motor, the Total Blender is a Powerhouse.

If you've seen the commercials, then you know that there's nothing that it can't blend. Turning grains into flour is no exception. Plus, it's totally affordable if you opt for the refurbished one which we've linked here.

While it's not one of the top-tier blender brands (like Vitamix and Blendtec), the Nutribullet series is pretty close.

The Rx comes with a whopping 1700 watt motor and a pretty large container for a bullet blender. This means that turning oats and other grains into flour for baking is a breeze.

Why Are These Blenders Good for Flour?

Motor Power 

All of the blenders on this list are significantly more powerful than the average blender on the market. Making flour can be taxing on the motor, so you want to make sure your motor won't overheat or stall while you're blending. 

Blades

While all of these blenders have different style blades, they're all decent at creating a vortex and keeping the dry grains, rice, or seeds moving towards them in a constant fashion. If the blender can't form a vortex, all of the grains will get stuck on the top and only the bottom will turn into flour and eventually overheat into a paste.

What's important to note is that the Vitamix dry grains jar blades is especially designed for making flours while the rest are designed to be more versatile. In the dry grain jar, the blades move the dry ingredients away from the blades so that nothing gets stuck and packed down.

We highly recommend the dry grains jar if you want the best for the job.

Warranty

With the exception of the Nutribullet, both the Vitamix and the Blendtec on this list have excellent warranties.

As we mentioned, the Vitamix with the dry grain container is the ultimate at making flour. Because the blades are designed to push the ingredients up and away, it allows all of the ingredients to quickly and easily form into a vortex.

Grinding Oat Flour in the Nutribullet

In this video, you can see how easy it is to grind oats into flour. I'm using the Nutribullet 900 here, which is even less powerful then than the Rx (which is on this list). The Rx has a motor that's almost double as powerful along with bigger blades and a bigger container.

In other words, the Nutribullet 900 and Classic 600 do just fine at grinding most flours, but the 


Vitamix 5300

Vitamix 5300 Blender, Black
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NutriBullet Rx N17-1001 Blender, Black

 

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So those are our best picks for blending flour. Here's a short summary of what we covered...

The Vitamix 5300  is our #1 pick for flours, especially if you can afford to get the dry grains jar. 

The Refurbished Blendtec Total Blender  will get the job done if you want a more budget-friendly alternative to a Vitamix.

The Nutribullet Rx  isn’t as heavy-duty and well-designed as the other two (in my opinion), but it still fits the bill.

Want to see our top blender picks of all time? Check out this guide to blender types.

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