Does Arugula Like Full Sun?

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Does Arugula Like Full Sun?

Gardening takes some know-how. Most of the time, you can’t just stick a plant in some soil in a sunny place and water it here and there.

It takes more skill and understanding than that. Part of this is knowing how much sunlight a plant needs for healthy growth.

Arugula is no exception to this rule. It requires sunlight, like most other plants, but the degree to which it needs sunlight could be different from others.

Here, we’ll be examining the question of if arugula likes full sun, or if it’s better for you to find a shady patch for this spicy salad green.

Quick Answer: Does Arugula Like Full Sun?

Yes, arugula likes full sun. It loves light, and needs ample light in order to germinate.

However, it doesn’t absolutely need full sunlight. In fact, you could extend your growing season a little by planting it in an area with noon shade.

The Best Lighting and Temperatures for Arugula

Arugula is a sun-loving plant. Make sure you put it somewhere it can get a large amount of sunlight every day. In numerical terms, it needs at least six hours of sunlight a day.

When it comes to temperatures, it requires cooler settings than the average plant. It can comfortably grow in temperatures ranging from 45 to 60 degrees.

In other words, as soon as you know frosts are finished, you can start growing your arugula. Although, as a hardier plant, some say that arugula can withstand some frosts, too, making it a wise choice for greenhouse growing in the winter.

Additional Arugula Growing Hints

Light isn’t the only thing you need to plan for when you start a garden. Let’s take a look at a few common areas you might have questions about when it comes to growing arugula:

  • Growing in a container.
  • Companion plants.
  • Harvesting time.

Growing in a container.

"Container growing might be the route for you if you don’t have the space for a garden or if you’d prefer to grow indoors."

Container growing might be the route for you if you don’t have the space for a garden or if you’d prefer to grow indoors. The good news is, it is indeed possible to grow arugula in a planter.

You’ll just need to know how to choose the correct planter. For starters, look for the ideal dimensions; your planter has to be at least six inches in depth to ensure your arugula has enough room for its roots.

Second, drainage is crucial. Arugula doesn’t like to sit in soggy conditions for a particularly long time. Not only does the soil you choose need to be well-draining, but your planter needs to be, too.

That means you should look for drainage holes in the bottom. Generally, more drainage holes is better.

Material can be important, too, as some materials are better at draining than others. Terracotta is great for this purpose, because its naturally porous material wicks away moisture quickly. Keep in mind that you may need to water your arugula more as a result.

Suggested companion plants.

If you’re wondering about companion plants, we’ve done the research for you.

Arugula works best with other leafy greens, such as lettuce or spinach. However, you can also plant it along with beans, beets, onions, carrots, or potatoes safely.

When to harvest.

Time isn’t the biggest factor in deciding when to harvest, because you can technically harvest arugula at different stages. Some choose to harvest it when it’s younger.

Assuming you’re looking for fully grown arugula, then you’ll wait to harvest it until the leaves are a couple inches long. It can take about two weeks to reach this point.

Wrap Up

Whenever we write about the growing conditions for arugula, we always recommend it for novice gardeners. This is a truly low maintenance plant, and we suggest it to anyone looking for a worry-free garden.

Arugula likes sun, well-draining soil, and room to grow. Meet those conditions, and you won’t have an issue getting it to thrive.

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