Vegetable Name: List of All Vegetables Name in English

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Vegetable Name: List of All Vegetables Name in English

Are you looking for a list of all vegetable names in English? You’ve come to the right place. We’re going to be listing out all of the most common American English vegetable names along with their pictures so that you can associate what they look like with how they are spelled.

Types of Vegetables

People categorize vegetables in many different ways depending on who is talking and the subject at hand. Here we will forego scientific classifications and list only types of vegetables as commonly discussed in everyday American life.

  1. Allium
  2. Beans
  3. Cabbages
  4. Cruciferous Vegetable
  5. Gourds
  6. Green Vegetables
  7. Greens
  8. Leafy Greens
  9. Leafy Vegetables
  10. Legumes
  11. Lettuces
  12. Marrow
  13. Mushrooms
  14. Peas
  15. Pods
  16. Red Vegetables
  17. Root Vegetables
  18. Seeds
  19. Squashes
  20. Stem Vegetables
  21. Tubers
  22. Vegetable Fruits

List of Vegetable Names

  1. Acorn Squash
  2. Artichoke
  3. Arugula
  4. Asparagus
  5. Aubergine
  6. Banana Pepper
  7. Bean
  8. Beet
  9. Beetroot
  10. Bell Pepper
  11. Bibb Lettuce
  12. Bitter Gourd
  13. Black Beans
  14. Blackeyed Peas
  15. Boston Lettuce
  16. Broccoli
  17. Brussels Sprout
  18. Butter Bean
  19. Buttercup squash
  20. Butternut Squash
  21. Cabbage
  22. Cantalope
  23. Caper
  24. Carrot
  25. Cauliflower
  26. Celeriac
  27. Celery
  28. Chickpeas
  29. Chicory
  30. Chives
  31. Chili Pepper
  32. Cluster Bean
  33. Collard
  34. Corn
  35. Courgette
  36. Cucumber
  37. Eggplant
  38. Endive
  39. English Pea
  40. Fava Bean
  41. Fennel
  42. Fluted pumpkin
  43. French Bean
  44. Garbanzo Bean
  45. Great Northern Bean
  46. Green Bean
  47. Green Onion
  48. Green Pepper
  49. Honey Dew Melon
  50. Horseradish
  51. Iceberg Lettuce
  52. Kale
  53. Kidney Beans
  54. Lady Finger
  55. Leaf Lettuce
  56. Leek
  57. Legume
  58. Lentil
  59. Lettuce
  60. Lima Bean
  61. Mushroom
  62. Mustard Green
  63. Napa Cabbage
  64. Okra
  65. Onion
  66. Pea
  67. Pepper
  68. Pinkeye Purple Hull
  69. Potato
  70. Pumpkin
  71. Pumpkin Radish
  72. Purple Cabbage
  73. Purple Onion
  74. Purple Yams
  75. Red Cabbage
  76. Red Onion
  77. Red Pepper
  78. Rocket Leaf
  79. Romaine Lettuce
  80. Runner Bean
  81. Rutabaga
  82. Scallion
  83. Sea Grape
  84. Sea Kale
  85. Snake Bean
  86. Sorrell
  87. Spinach
  88. Spring Onion
  89. Squash
  90. String Bean
  91. Summer Squash
  92. Sweet Pepper
  93. Sweet Potato
  94. Tomato
  95. Turnip
  96. Turnip Greens
  97. Watercress
  98. Watermelon
  99. White Onion
  100. Winged Bean
  101. Winter Melon
  102. Yam
  103. Yellow Onion
  104. Yellow Squash
  105. Zucchini

Vegetable Names in English with Pictures

Acorn Squash

Acorn squashes are typically baked with the seeds removed in autumn. They’re served as a side dish or as a main by stuffing other ingredients inside of the squash. They are typically yellowish orange on the inside with green skin.

Acorn Squash

Artichoke

Artichoke is the bud or flower of a thistle. They can be braised, grilled, boiled, steamed or stuffed, and baked. The outer leaves are too tough to chew but scraping their inner surface with your teeth yields a delectable pulp. The artichoke heart is completely edible. 

Artichoke

Arugula

Arugula is a leafy green that people have been eating since roman times. It has dark green leaves with deep notches up and down each side and is most often eaten in salads.  Arugula is also deliciously steamed or sauteed and used as a side dish or added to soups and pasta dishes. 

Arugula

Asparagus

Asparagus spears are long then and closely resemble green paintbrushes. They are versatile and can be chopped and added to soups, souffles, or steamed as a side dish. The best way to serve asparagus is either grilled or baked with a light sauce.

Asparagus

Aubergine

Aubergine is an old-world variety of eggplant with deep purple skin. It soaks up flavors well and is lovely in soups, stews, and curry dishes or can be grilled, fried, broiled, or steamed and served a vegetable main.

Aubergine

Banana Pepper

Banana Peppers are medium-sized chili peppers that have little to no heat and a sweet taste. They are yellow and shaped much like a banana. You can eat raw banana peppers, use them as an alternative to hotter peppers when cooking, or stuff them as a side dish. Banana peppers also make excellent pickled peppers.

Banana Pepper

Bean

A bean is any seed from the flowering plant family Fabaceae. There are hundreds of different types of beans, and you can use them in many different ways. Beans are a good source of protein and an essential part of a vegan diet.  

Bean

Beet

Beets are an often underrated root vegetable. Most often a purple, there are also golden varieties. Beets tend to have a bitter, earthy flavor, but they develop a subtle sweetness when baked or grilled till tender. Though often overlooked, the greens of the beet are also edible and taste similar to turnip greens.

Beet

Beetroot

Beetroots are the edible taproot of the beet plant. They are usually purple, but golden examples are also grown. Beetroots have a bitter earthy flavor but turn sweet when grilled or baked. Making pickled beets is a popular way of preserving this vegetable.

 

Beetroot

Bell Pepper

Bell Peppers, also called sweet peppers, are the only types of peppers incapable of producing capsaicin. Capsaicin is the chemical that gives chilies their heat. They are squat, wide, and shaped like an old-world cowbell, giving them their name. Bell peppers come in many colors and are so versatile that chefs have dedicated entire cookbooks to them.

Bell Pepper

Bibb Lettuce

Bibb lettuce is a smaller version of butterhead lettuce with short, smooth-edged leaves. Bibb lettuce leaves are most commonly used as a salad green but make excellent wraps and are tasty wilted as a side dish.

Bibb Lettuce

Bitter Gourd

Bitter gourd is a relative newcomer to the United States but has been a staple in Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean for eons. As the name implies, it has a very bitter taste. When preparing, you should split the gourd in half and use a spoon to scrape out the core and seeds.

Bitter Gourd

Black Beans

Black beans are a small shiny type of turtle bean commonly used in creole, cajun, and Latin American cuisine. Black beans absorb flavors well, and they tend to take the edge off of spicy dishes.  

Black Beans

Blackeyed Peas

Blackeyed Peas are a sub-species of cowpeas with pale skin and a black eye where the legume was attached to the pod. Often eaten, seasoned alone, blackeyed peas are also excellent mashed and used as a base for dips or protein-rich baked goods.

Blackeyed Peas

Boston Lettuce

Boston lettuce is a larger member of the butterhead lettuce group. Its smooth-edged leaves range from pale to dark green. Boston lettuce has a silky flavor making it a green salade favorite.

Boston Lettuce

Broccoli

Broccoli is a member of the cabbage family. The entire plant is edible, but most people only eat the stem and large flowers. Broccoli can be steamed and eaten alone or incorporated into salads, soups, stir-fries, and casseroles.

Broccoli

Brussels Sprout

Brussels sprouts are one of few members of the cabbage family that people eat the bud instead of the mature flower. Named after Brussels, Belgium, Brussel sprouts are most often eaten boiled, steamed, or grilled.

Brussels Sprout

Butter Bean

Butter beans are white to cream-colored beans with a flat profile and curved shape. There are many varieties of butter beans, and they are generally all served alone, lightly seasoned, or as a mash.

Butter Bean

Buttercup squash

Buttercup squash has dark green skin and resembles large acorns in shape. The flesh can be cubed and incorporated into other dishes, or you can cut the squash in half. Scoop out the seeds and fill them with your favorite stuffing ingredients.

Buttercup squash

Butternut Squash

Butternut squash is a yellow winter squash with a flavor similar to pumpkin. It can be stuffed and served as a main dish or pureed to make soup.

Butternut Squash

Cabbage

Cabbage is a large family of vegetables most recognizable by their dense-leaved heads. Cabbage comes in many colors, and you can serve it cooked, incorporated into salads, or as a slaw.

Cabbage

Cantalope

Cantalope is a sweet type of muskmelon with deep orange flesh. Most people eat cantaloupes alone, but you can add them to fruit salads.

Cantalope

Capers

Capers are the pickled fruit of the Capparis spinosa bush. They are salty green pea-sized balls commonly used as an ingredient in Mediterranean cuisine. Capers are high in sodium but also nutrient-rich.

Caper

Carrot

The carrot is one of Amerca’s favorite root vegetables. They are most often orange, but white, yellow and white varieties do exist. Carrots are lovely served raw or added to many dishes, both sweet and savory.

Carrot

Cauliflower

Cauliflower is a large bloom member of the cabbage family with dense white lumpy heads. Very mild in flavor, cauliflower is eaten raw with dips or grilled or added to other dishes.

Cauliflower

Celeriac

Celeriac is the bulb portion of a specific type of celery plant, the Apium graveolens var. rapaceum. It has a texture like potatoes but an earthy flavor with hints of celery taste.

Celeriac

Celery

Celery has long, pale green, fibrous stalks that taper into leaves. Cultivated since antiquity, it is very versatile and best eaten raw or lightly cooked. Many people use the leaves as a cooking herb, both fresh and dried.

Celery

Chickpeas

People also refer to Chickpeas as gram or garbanzo beans are very dense. They should be soaked and simmered for long periods when cooking. Chickpeas are usually served alone but are also the base of hummus.

Chickpeas

Chicory

Chicory is a woody member of the daisy family. Its leaves get used as a salad green, and its root can be baked ground and used as a coffee substitute.

Chicory

Chives

People generally think of chives as the dried leaves of the Allium schoenoprasum plant. The whole plant is a chive. Chives fresh or dried have a light oniony flavor and are used as a cooking herb or added fresh to salads.

Chives

Chili Pepper

Chili peppers are the fruit of any member of the genus Capsicum. They range in flavor from sweet and mild to unbelievably spicy. Almost every cuisine in the world uses chili peppers in some way.   

Chili Pepper

Cluster Bean

Cluster beans are an important member of the legume family. High in protein and drought-resistant, they are among the very few viable crops in many arid regions of the world.

Cluster Bean

Collards

Collards are a close relative to kale and have a very similar nutritional profile. The entire collard plant is edible, but most people only eat the greens. These are often boiled, steamed, or wilted and served as a side dish.

Collard

Corn

Corn is rich in vitamin C and many antioxidants. Generally considered a vegetable, it is more closely related to grains, sugar cane, and bamboo.

Corn

Courgette

A courgette is smooth-skinned, green summer squash closely related to and used much like zucchini. However, farmers usually harvest the fruit early when the seeds and rine are still soft. As food, they are used much like a cucumber.

Courgette

Cucumber

Cucumbers are the fruit of a creeping vine plant now cultivated on every continent. You can eat cucumbers raw, make pickles from them, or even bake and grill them.

Cucumber

Eggplant

Eggplant is a slick-skinned spongy vegetable in the nightshade family. Made up mostly of water, eggplant absorbs other flavors well, but caution should be used when combining eggplant with oily ingredients.

Eggplant

Endive

Endive is low in calories and high in nutrition. Many people enjoy tender, endive leaves braised, sautéed, or even grilled, but they truly shine when used as boats for other light recipes.  

Endive

English Pea

English Peas are an excellent addition to many dishes, but fresh English or shell peas can be hard to find. 95% of all English peas grown end up canned.

English Pea

Fava Bean

Also called broad beans, fava beans are one of the oldest known cultivated crops. Valued in cooler regions for their hardiness, they bloom and fruit early and bear late into autumn.

Fava Bean

Fennel

Fennel is a mild-flavored vegetable with a slight licorice taste. Often served shaved as a garnish, fennel is at home in soups, salads, or mixed with other fragrant herbs in a wide array of dishes.

Fennel

Fluted pumpkin

What makes fluted pumpkins stand out is that the fruit itself is inedible. Cooks use the vine’s leaves in soups, salads, and sauces, and the seeds are prepared much like beans.

Fluted pumpkin

French Bean

Many types of beans, pole or bush, fall under the name ‘french bean.’ You can eat the mature seeds, but people often pick the immature seed pods and cook them whole or sliced.  

French Bean

Garbanzo Bean

Garbanzo Bean is the Italian name for chickpea. These highly versatile beans are excellent alone, but people also use them to make hummus and meat substitutes for burgers.  

Garbanzo Bean

Great Northern Bean

Great Northern’s are a popular white bean throughout America. People commonly add them to casseroles, soups, and stews, but they are wonderful served alone as a side dish.

Great Northern Bean

Green Bean

Green Bean is a blanket name covering many different types of runner beans, string beans, and snap peas. What they have in common is the seed pods being picked and eaten while still immature.

Green Bean

Green Onion

Green onions, scallions, and spring onions are all regarded as the same vegetable. These are the green tops from several different varieties of the genus Allium. They have a mild onion flavor and bright green color that livens up many savory dishes.

Green Onion

Green Pepper

Green peppers are immature bell peppers. They have a slightly bitter taste as compared to more mature fruits. People normally eat green peppers as a pizza topping, added to soups and salads, or stuffed and baked.

Green Pepper

Honey Dew Melon

Honeydew melons are sweet fruit with a light yellow to white peel and pastel green flesh. People usually slice honeydews in half, scoop out the seeds, and eat them fresh.

Honey Dew Melon

Horseradish

Horseradish is a member of the mustard family, but unlike most of this group, it is the root and not the leaves eaten. People mix horseradish root with vinegar and other seasonings as a condiment served along with a wide variety of dishes. 

Horseradish

Iceberg Lettuce

Iceberg lettuce is a sandwich and salad staple and one of the most commonly eaten leafy greens in the United States. Fairley high in nutrients and very low in calories, it is a featured vegetable in many diets.

Iceberg Lettuce

Kale

Kale is a nutrient-dense superfood highly reported to have many health benefits. People eat call in many ways, including raw, steamed, added to soups, as a pizza and sandwich topping, or added to smoothies.

Kale

Kidney Beans

Kidney beans are a type of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). A common ingredient in chili dishes, Kidney beans are also excellent in salads or pureed as a base for dips.

Kidney Beans

Lady Finger

Also known as okra or okro, lady fingers are a member of the mallow family.  Loved and loathed by many, lady fingers are rich in antioxidants, minerals, vitamins, and fiber. 

Lady Finger

Leaf Lettuce

Leaf lettuce is a blanket term that can cover many different types of lettuce. What sets leaf lettuce apart is having loose leaves instead of forming a head like iceberg lettuce.

Leaf Lettuce

Leek

Leeks are a close relative of garlic, onion, scallion, shallot, chive, and Chinese onions. Many people enjoy leek’s mild oniony flavor braised, boiled, fried, roasted, or lightly sauteed in olive oil.

Leek

Legume

Legume covers a huge family of plants: beans, peas, chickpeas, soybeans, mesquite, peanuts, tamarind, lentils, lupins, carob, clover, and alfalfa—basically, any plant whose fruit is in the form of pods.

Legume

Lentil

Americans most widely recognize lentils for their use as split peas or in lentil soup. However, they are a staple in many styles of Indian cuisine.

Lentil

Lettuce

Lettuce is an entire group of vegetables generally grown for their large, crisp leaves. Most people use lettuce as a base for salads or sandwich toppings, but lettuce leaves are wonderful for wraps or grilled.

Lettuce

Lima Bean

Also called butter beans, lima beans are some of the most nutritious legumes you can eat. High in fiber, protein, and many vitamins and minerals, you can compare their nutrition levels to spinach and broccoli.

Lima Bean

Mushroom

Mushrooms are a rich source of antioxidants, fiber, and protein. Most people only recognize the portion of a mushroom that appears above ground, but that is only the plant’s flower. Most of the fungi are underground. 

Mushroom

Mustard Green

The mustard plant is the ancestor of many of the leafy greens we enjoy today but often underappreciated. Mustard greens have a peppery flavor that goes well with sauteed onions and garlic, or they can be steamed and eaten alone.

Mustard Green

Napa Cabbage

Napa Cabbage is a form of Chinese cabbage that originated in the Beijing region. Noted for its mildly sweet flavor and tender stems, Napa cabbage is mainly consumed as fresh green.

Napa Cabbage

Okra

Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus), commonly used in West African and South Asian cuisines, is often underappreciated in the United States. Outside of creole and cajun dishes, it is generally steamed or fried.

Okra

Onion

Onions are one of the most popular savory ingredients on the planet. Used in virtually every cooking style, they can be tangy or sweet depending on the variety and prepared with almost any cooking method.

Onion

Pea

Peas are a large group of green or yellow seeds that grow in pods. Normally eaten as a side dish, people do incorporate them into soups, salads, and casseroles. Some varieties of peas are delicious, eaten raw fresh from the garden.

Pea

Pepper

Pepper comes in three forms: white, red, and most commonly black. All of these come from the same vine, and their color depends on at what stage of maturity they get harvested.

Pepper

Pinkeye Purple Hull

Pinkeye purple hulls or cowpeas are semi-bush beans grown throughout the United States. As their name implies, the hull is a deep purple, and the beans themselves have a pink-colored eye where they were attached to the inside of the pod.

Pinkeye Purple Hull

Potato

Potatoes are one of the world’s most commonly eaten vegetables. The starchy tuber is eaten almost exclusively in America, but some Native American, Asian, and African cuisines also value the leaves.  

Potato

Pumpkin

Pumpkins are part of the winter squash family with smooth, slightly ribbed skin and dark orange flesh. People use the meat of the pumpkin in dishes ranging from sweet to savory and dry the seeds to eat as a snack food.  

Pumpkin

Pumpkin Radish

The pumpkin radish is native to Southeast Asia and Central Asia. It has a smooth, orange, slightly ribbed skin appearing much like a small pumpkin. In flavor, it is much like a common radish. 

Pumpkin Radish

Purple Cabbage

Purple cabbage is close to kale, broccoli, and Brussel sprouts in flavor and offers similar nutritional benefits. In addition, Purple cabbage is high in carotenoids and other antioxidants. 

Purple Cabbage

Purple Onion

Purple onions are any member of the Allium cepa family with dark purple skin. Many people prefer purple onions to other varieties because they have a sweeter flavor than almost any other type.  

Purple Onion

Purple Yams

Purple Yams, also known as water yams or ube, are a tuber native to Southeast Asia. Similar in taste to a common yam, their flesh has a deep purple color that adds brightness to any dish you use them in.  

Purple Yams

Red Cabbage

Red cabbages get their red-orange color from anthocyanins. Anthocyanins are compounds found in many colorful plants and reported by physicians to be high in antioxidant properties.  

Red Cabbage

Red Onion

Red onions are very similar to purple onions. They are valued in the culinary arts for their sweet taste, and the skin is used to produce some traditional textile dyes.

Red Onion

Red Pepper

Red peppers can be any member of the capsicum family the ripens to a red color. However, in culinary circles, the name is usually reserved for red bell peppers.

Red Pepper

Rocket Leaf

Rocket leaf is often confused with arugula in Western countries due to them having a similar flavor profile. True rocket, though, has a smoother-edged leaf and more pungent taste than arugula.

Rocket Leaf

Romaine Lettuce

Romaine is a tall, dark green loose-leaf lettuce with stout white ribs in its centers. It is more heat tolerant than most other types of lettuce, making it ideal as a mid-summer crop.

Romaine Lettuce

Runner Bean

Runner beans are perennial beans native to Central and South America but now grown by farmers worldwide. Tolerant of cool weather, they will overwinter in areas where the ground does not freeze.

Runner Bean

Rutabaga

A hybrid between turnips and cabbages, rutabagas were first intended as cattle fodder. That was before people discovered how sweet the tasty root was. You can use rutabagas as healthier alternatives to potatoes in almost any dish.

Rutabaga

Scallion

Scallions are any form of green onion with long leaves and underdeveloped bulbs. Prized for their mild onion flavor, people most often the leaves as well as the bulbs.

Scallion

Sea Grape

A form of blue-green algae, sea grapes get their name from their strong resemblance to actual grapes. Having a strong salty taste, sea grapes have tender flesh but should be rinsed in cool, clear water to eliminate their fishy smell.

Sea Grape

Sea Kale

Sea kale belongs to the Brassicaceae family and shares most of its other members’ nutritional benefits. Salt tolerant, it grows well in coastal areas. The most traditional way of eating sea kale is to blanch the whole stalks and eat the greens.

Sea Kale

Snake Bean

Also called yard-long beans, snake beans are native to Asia but grown by farmers worldwide. Fast-growing and tolerant of dry and poor soil conditions, the U.N. classifies snake beans as an essential crop in many developing counties.

Snake Bean

Sorrell

Sorrell is a leafy green eaten as a vegetable and used as a culinary herb. It has a sour lemony flavor that is very distinct, and many consider an acquired taste.

Sorrell

Spinach

Spinach is one of the healthiest and most versatile leafy greens available. Commonly used in salads or served steamed, you can add spinach to pesto, crepe batter, or even can it for long-term storage.

Spinach

Spring Onion

Onion types that grow long, tender leaves but have underdeveloped bulbs can be considered spring onions. They have a milder flavor than regular onions, and the entire plant, other than the root tip, is usually eaten. 

Spring Onion

Squash

Squash comes in two general categories; winter and summer. Despite their names, both are warm-weather crops. Winter squash gets its name because you can store them over the winter better than summer varieties.

Squash

String Bean

String beans are older types of beans. These beans have a string that separates the two haves of the seed pod. Most modern varieties of beans have had this string bred out of them.

String Bean

Summer Squash

Summer squash is any type of squash that usually gets harvested while still immature, and its flesh is still tender. They differ from winter squash by having very short shelf lives. 

Summer Squash

Sweet Pepper

People refer to several members of the capsicum family as sweet peppers, but this is actually incorrect. The only proper sweet peppers are bell peppers. They are called sweet due to their inability to produce the chemical that makes peppers hot.

Sweet Pepper

Sweet Potato

A close relative of white potatoes, sweet potatoes contain more sugar, and most varieties are much starchier. Often confused with yams, sweet potatoes are not related to true yams but fall into an entirely different family.  

Sweet Potato

Tomato

Tomatoes are the edible berries of the Solanum Lycopersicum and Lycopersicon Lycopersicum plants. Once thought to be poisonous, people now consume hundreds of tons of tomatoes each year.  

Tomato

Turnip

Commonly grown in temperate climates globally, people raise turnips both for food and for fodder. The greens have a light pepper flavor but can be bitter in older plants, and the bulb taste falls between cabbage and radishes in taste.

Turnip

Turnip Greens

You can use turnip greens much as you would any other lettuce, cabbage, or other hearty green. Slightly more savory than many, they are pretty tasty and nutrient-dense.

Turnip Greens

Watercress

Watercress is one of the oldest known leafy greens that people eat. Native to Europe and Asia, watercress is an aquatic plant that multiplies quickly and is easy to domesticate. Often used as a lettuce alternative, the watercress leaf is a very versatile green.  

Watercress

Watermelon

There are over 1,000 varieties of watermelons grown across the world. They can range in size from not much bigger than a cantaloupe to over 70 lbs. and can have pale yellow to dark ruby red meat.

Watermelon

White Onion

People love white onions because they are high in sugar but low in low sulfur. This gives them a lighter flavor than yellow onions but a relatively short shelf life.

White Onion

Winged Bean

Winged beans are considered a highly underutilized vegetable native to Southeast Asia. Disease-resistant and entirely edible, winged beans are commonly grown as a garden crop but could become a significant food source in tropical regions.  

Winged Bean

Winter Melon

Winter melon, a common ingredient in many traditional Indian and Chinese dishes, can often be found sliced in your produce section. A large member of the cucumber family, winter melons can weigh as much as 40 lbs. The meat is inedible raw and normally served steamed, stewed, or parboiled.

Winter Melon

Yam

Often confused with sweet potatoes, yams have scaley skins and rounded ends instead of smooth and pointed. Yams are sweeter and grow much larger but are harder to harvest and nutritionally inferior to sweet potatoes.

Yam

Yellow Onion

More pungent than white or purple onions, yellow onions are low sugar, high sulfur varieties with brown to gold papery skins. Yellow onions can be eaten raw, but most people reserve them for cooking due to their intense flavor.  

Yellow Onion

Yellow Squash

Often called a crookneck squash, yellow squash is a fast-growing type of summer squash with bumpy yellow skin and meaty flesh. Often paired with zucchini in dishes, yellow squash is also excellent when mixed with savory ingredients like peppers and onions.   

Yellow Squash

Zucchini

Zucchini is a type of summer squash with smooth green skin. Very versatile, you can cook zucchini in many different ways, including making cakes. Make sure to pick smaller fruits, though, as they get tougher as they grow. 

Zucchini

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