Best Greenhouses for Southern California – Top 8 Options

Disclosure: As Amazon Associates we earn from qualifying purchases. We also receive small commissions from other online vendors that we may recommend on our blog posts.
Best Greenhouses for Southern California

Are you trying to find a greenhouse suitable for the warm Southern California environment?

There are a lot of greenhouses on the market today, and not all of them are equal. Some are better suited to specific climates than others.

Southern California has its own set of requirements for any garden, though, because it’s full of unique microclimates. That’s why we’ve created this list of the best greenhouses for Southern California.

We’ll explain why each greenhouse on this list would be perfect for SoCal, and also how to choose one of your own.

Best Greenhouses for Southern California

One thing the Best Choice Products Walk-In Greenhouse has going for it is that it’s much lighter weight than the others on this list. You won’t have to strain your back putting it together, because as a whole, the shipping weight for this sturdy greenhouse is 61 pounds.

It’s got ample ventilation, too. One each side of the tunnel there are four windows that can be rolled up to let in some air. Open them up on both sides to get a cross-breeze flowing through the greenhouse.

The material it’s made from can stand up to the test of extreme weather. Its cover is made from double-threaded plastic, while its powder-coated steel frame resists rust.

Pros:

  • Eight roll-up windows you can open for some airflow.
  • The roll-up windows have screens, preventing bugs from getting inside when you have them open.
  • Powder coating on the frame protects it from rusting.
  • Lighter weight so you can easily put it together.
  • The round shape naturally gives you more headroom.

Cons:

  • Some customers felt the assembly instructions weren’t easy to understand. 
Palram Glory Greenhouse

The Palram Glory Greenhouse really lives up to its name. It’s jam-packed with all sorts of innovative and convenient features that make it one of the most useful greenhouses you can find.

On top, you’ll see that there’s a roof vent. But you don’t have to open the vent yourself. It will come open on its own as the heat rises, and it will close by itself once it cools again.

However, the roof isn’t the only part of the greenhouse with windows. The side has a louver window that improves airflow. This airflow is one of the easiest ways you’ll have of preventing your plants from getting too warm.

Pros:

  • Has an automatic vent on top.
  • The side window promotes natural cooling and airflow.
  • Includes a kit to install a steel base, which improves its stability.
  • Can hold over a thousand pounds of snow – perfect for those high altitude snowy regions.
  • It’s tough enough to withstand winds up to 50 mph.

Cons:

  • There are some reports that getting the base level was a bit difficult.
Rion EcoGrow Twin Wall Greenhouse

Insulation is this greenhouse’s specialty. The tough polycarbonate panels you see lining its sides and roof are twin-walled. Not only does this make them sturdier, but it helps keep hot or cold air from coming in when you don’t want it to.

But they’re also beginner-friendly if you’re not very handy. Instead of any sort of complex assembly for the roof panels, they just slide into place.

Even the frame is built with convenience and longevity in mind. It’s made out of weatherproof resin, and you can put it together using an easy pin and lock system.

Pros:

  • The panels slide in and the frame is put together with a lock and pin system for easy assembly.
  • Has a ventilation window built into the roof.
  • Frame and panels are both resistant to UV rays.
  • Capable of holding up to 30 pounds of snow and withstanding 55 mph winds.

Cons:

  • None reported yet.
Mt. Hood Greenhouse

Gorgeous and natural redwood makes this greenhouse a refreshing change of pace. It’s ideal for lovers of the rustic aesthetic. But the wooden frame is so much more than charming – it can stand strong under winds up to 100 mph, making it one of the most dependable on this list.

With this greenhouse, stability starts from the ground up. Aside from an incredibly tough frame, it has a base that is both fungus- and insect-proof.

You can safely use it year-round, too. Even during the winter, its angled roof panels make it possible for it to capture and disperse sunlight to your garden.

Pros:

  • Uses shatter-proof polycarbonate panels.
  • The angles on the roof allow the top of the greenhouse to get the sun even when it’s low in the sky.
  • Reliable and natural redwood will stand up to winds up to 100 mph.
  • Fungus- and insect-resistant base.
  • All you need to assemble it is a power drill, six-foot ladder, level, and tape measure.

Cons:

  • Some customers felt the instructions were unclear.
Petite Greenhouse

When you see a lot of greenhouses, you start to notice that many of them look the same. If you’re the kind of person who likes to stand out from the crowd, a cookie cutter greenhouse like countless others just won’t do.

Fortunately, there are beautiful greenhouses like Little Cottage Company’s Petite Greenhouse. As you might have guessed from the name, it’s a pretty small structure, measuring only 5 feet wide by 2.5 feet deep.

If you don’t need a large greenhouse, this could be perfect for you. Not only will it not take up a lot of room, but it will house a few of your plants in utter comfort and style.

Pros:

  • Small size is great for crowded yards, balconies, or patios.
  • Has a built-in shelf to hold your potted plants.
  • Cute cottage design that looks just like a tiny house.
  • Allows for ample ventilation with a window vent.

Cons:

  • No issues reported at this point in time.
Palram Mythos Greenhouse

If what you’re looking for is a moderately sized greenhouse with an equally moderate price tag, the Palram Mythos Greenhouse could be precisely what you need. Measuring at six feet by six feet, you can comfortably walk into it to tend to your plants.

It also has a few features that you usually only see with much larger and more expensive greenhouses. The panels lining its walls and roof are made from long-lived polycarbonate, for example.

You can demand longevity from it, as well. It’s able to safely hold up to 15 pounds of snow or resist winds up to 55 mph.

Pros:

  • Available in either a neutral silver or vibrant green.
  • This can be a pretty affordable greenhouse.
  • Its twin-walled polycarbonate panels are long-lasting and easy to clean.
  • Rated for up to 55 mph winds.
  • Built-in roof vent.

Cons:

  • There are reports that it was hard to assemble, and that assembly took a long time.
  • Some customers felt that the panels seemed a little fragile.
Grand Gardener Greenhouse

We feel that Rion Greenhouse’s Grand Gardener was very aptly named. Even just looking at, you can see that it looks stately and elegant.

Looks aren’t the only reason we’d include a greenhouse here, though. We loved the row of vents located on the roof, which plenty of hot air could escape from.

The resin frame improves the greenhouse’s insulation, which is critical either in the winter or hot summer. Ample insulation will help preserve the environment inside your greenhouse.

Pros:

  • Provides more than enough ventilation with its roof windows.
  • The resin frame improves the insulation of the greenhouse.
  • Barn shape gives you tons of headroom.
  • Each panel is made from polycarbonate, which is just about impossible to destroy.
  • Rated for winds up to 55 mph.

Cons:

  • Some buyers reported that the assembly takes a long time.
Riga Greenhouse

It may seem humble at a first glance, but this greenhouse is anything except modest. There are more than a few reasons it has been so well-loved in the past.

For one thing, the vents on the top are automatic. You won’t ever need to rush to open them manually on hot days, because they’ll rise open by themselves, releasing pent-up hot air.

If you live in a high-altitude, this reliable structure can keep standing under a pile under a pile of snow weighing up to 180 pounds. High winds aren’t an issue for it, either, partially because of its bell shape and partially because of its hardy panels. It can endure 80-mph winds.

Pros:

  • Automatic vents will open on their own when it gets too hot.
  • Includes integrated shelving to hold planters for you.
  • The frame can hold up to 180 pounds of snow.
  • Large size to accommodate a bigger garden.
  • Can endure 80-mph winds.
  • No additional tools necessary to put it together.

Cons:

  • No reported issues currently.

What to Consider When Buying a Greenhouse for Southern California

Ventilation

Southern California encompasses a large area with its own microclimates. Because of this, you can’t really say that the entire area is hot, cold, humid, or any other description.

If you live in the mountains, you may have to deal with heavy snow in the winter. On the other hand, if you don’t live in a high altitude, winters will be mild and summers will be scorching.

For hotter areas, you’ll want to ensure your greenhouse has ample ventilation, because it’s one of the simplest ways to keep your plants nice and cool. Ideally, the vents should be on the roof, because heat rises.

However, if you’re located in an area with milder temperatures or freezing winters, this may not be as big of a concern for you.

Cooling

In any hot climate, heat can become a major problem for your plants. Your greenhouse can transform into a ruthless oven that bakes them alive on blazing summer days.

Ventilation will help, but you should take other steps to keep your greenhouse cool, too. Fans are wonderful, because they get a cooling cross-breeze flowing through.

You can also install blinds in your greenhouse. But if you’re looking for a more affordable option than blinds, a shade cloth can be a wise choice. Installing it above or inside the greenhouse will help protect your plants from excess sunlight.

If your greenhouse has a hard floor, damping down is another option. Damping down means spraying the surface with water, which helps cool the air slightly as it evaporates over time.

We’ve talked about cooling greenhouses here. The article focuses on Florida, but the same cooling concepts can be modified for use in any hot climate.

Insulation

Regardless of whether you’re living at a high or low altitude, insulation is something else you’ll need to consider. Put briefly, sufficient insulation stabilizes the environment inside the structure. It keeps the air you want in, while keeping out the temperatures you don’t want.

Some greenhouses have frames designed to help with insulation. But if you want to be extra cautious, you can look at sealing any cracks around windows and doors for increased protection.

Wrap Up

We picked each greenhouse on this list because we felt they all deserved to be mentioned. However, we’d by lying if we said we didn’t have a favorite, and our favorite is the Riga Greenhouse.

Capable of holding 180 pounds of snow and resisting 80-mph winds, it’s one of the most durable options on this list. What’s more, we love the automatic vents on the roof, because it means you don’t have to break out a step ladder to open and close them throughout the day.

Want to know which greenhouses are best in hot desert climates? You can read out list about it here.

Leave a Comment