Best Greenhouses for Colorado – Top 8 Options

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Best Greenhouses for Colorado

Colorado has one of the most interesting and diverse climates in the United States. Unlike with many other states, the general rule of thumb that the northern parts are colder than the southern ones isn’t necessarily true in Colorado.

With high mountains, drastic storms, and oftentimes droughts, this beautiful state can be a real uphill battle (or should we say upmountain battle?) to garden in.

But a good greenhouse can make it possible year-round. We’ve done the digging for you and found several of the best greenhouses for Colorado.

Best Greenhouses for Colorado

Riga Greenhouse

Riga Greenhouse

Fierce sun, rain, winds, and snow are all conditions that occur naturally in Colorado. A greenhouse like the Riga Greenhouse is perfect for standing up to the test of these types of weather.

Able to stand up to 80 mph of wind, and hold 180 pounds of snow, this is a greenhouse you could have even on a harsh mountainside. If that didn’t convince you, consider the fact that it’s resistant to UV rays, rot, and mildew, which leads to it being long-lasting.

Pros:

  • The rounded bell shape makes it wind resistant, and allows snow to slip off.
  • Vents on the roof open automatically when it gets too hot inside.
  • Resistant to UV rays, rot, and mildew.
  • Includes an anchoring kit to secure it in place.

Cons:

  • None reported yet.

Not everyone has the room for a huge stationary greenhouse. Some have small yards, or may not even have yards at all if they live in apartment. The good news is, there are greenhouses that are manageably sized, just like this one.

Aside from being possible to fit pretty much anywhere, this is a tenacious contender. Crafted from natural fir wood, it’s waterproof and resistant to UV rays.

To further protect your plants, the double doors are held shut by powerful magnets. These doors won’t fly open when you don’t want them to.

Pros:

  • Easy to assemble.
  • Made from beautiful natural fir.
  • Waterproof and resistant to UV rays.
  • The doors shut firmly because of their magnets.
  • Small size that’s perfect for patios, porches, and balconies.

Cons:

  • Has no wheels on the bottom to move it around with.
Mt. Hood Greenhouse

Looking for one of the hardiest greenhouses on the market? You really can’t go wrong with the Mt. Hood Greenhouse.

Its wooden frame is natural redwood. And believe us when we say it’s tough – it can stand up against hurricane-strength 100-mph winds.

But on the other hand, it’s built for the rigors of winter, too. Slanted panels on the top allow it to gather light from the low-hanging winter sun, making it possible to garden year-round.

Pros:

  • Has a high wind resistance rating.
  • Can efficiently diffuse sunlight all year long.
  • Made from a natural redwood frame.
  • Has a roof and back wall vent to release hot air.

Cons:

  • Some customers felt the assembly directions were unclear.
8 Ft. W 8 Ft D Greenhouse

One of the best things about this greenhouse is how striking it is. The round sides and pointed top make it look like a noble tower.

But it’s also simply perfect for raising your plants in. The windows circling the sides and the durable polycarbonate panels on top allow it to draw in as much sunlight as possible.

When it gets too hot inside, you can open the windows to let out some of the pent-up stale air. You won’t need to worry about this allowing bugs in, though, because the windows have screens on them.

This beautiful greenhouse can even endure severe storms. With a wind rating of 90 mph, it can withstand hurricanes and small tornadoes.

Pros:

  • Appealing look.
  • Can resist mold, rot, and UV rays.
  • Endures winds up to 90 mph.
  • You can open the windows for ventilation.
  • The windows have screens on them to keep pests from getting in.

Cons:

  • Does not include paint to go over the panels.

Although most people don’t think of Colorado as an arid region, there’s very rarely a period of time where some part of it isn’t undergoing a drought. Water efficiency can be crucial in parts of Colorado.

That’s where this Palram Hybrid Hobby Greenhouse comes in. It has gutters built onto the edges of the roof, which allow you to gather any rainwater. Then, you can store the rainwater and use it to water your plants in the future.

Pros:

  • Exterior gutters allow you to store rainwater.
  • The polycarbonate panels are pretty much indestructible.
  • The frame is resistant to rust.
  • Lockable door for increased security.
  • Heavy-duty steel base to further the stability of the greenhouse.

Cons:

  • Some buyers stated it took a long time to put together.
  • There are a few reports of customers not receiving all the parts.
Colonial Gable Greenhouse

The Colonial Gable Hobby Greenhouse is one of the prettiest greenhouses on the market. In fact, we almost think we’d move into it. It looks just like a tiny house.

Beyond looks, it’s a sturdy structure. You can expect it to endure winds up to 95 mph, so it’s an ideal choice for extreme weather conditions.

When heat starts to become a concern, you can open the windows for ventilation. There’s also a vent located on the wall above the door.

Pros:

  • There’s ample ventilation with the windows and wall vent.
  • A shelf is included on the inside.
  • Alluring design that you can feel proud of having on your lawn.
  • Capable of standing up under extreme weather conditions.

Cons:

  • Does not include any paint for the exterior.

This is another illustration of a greenhouse with a well-designed shape. Its rounded and arched profile increases its wind resistance and keeps snow from piling on top. The peak gives you plenty of room to stand up inside, too.

Double-walled polycarbonate panels aid insulation by holding heat well. The dual walls also lend durability to the panels, so they’re nearly impossible to break.

Pros:

  • Rounded shape keeps snow from piling on top.
  • Resistant to high winds.
  • The galvanized steel base stabilizes the structure.
  • Twin-wall polycarbonate panels block dangerous UV rays and diffuse light efficiently.
  • A vent on top allows hot air to escape when it’s too warm inside.

Cons:

  • Some customers reported that assembly was difficult and took a long time.

Are you looking for a greenhouse that’s a happy middle ground between large and small? Palram’s Hybrid Lean Greenhouse could be what you need.

One of the best things about choosing a leaning greenhouse like this is that you won’t need to worry about one of the walls. That’s because, as the name implies, it leans on another building. You can put it up against your house for easy access, or maybe a shed.

Water efficiency matters here, too. It has exterior rain gutters on the edge that make water collection possible, which could be a game changer in a drought.

Pros:

  • The vent in the roof lets out excess hot air and humidity.
  • Exterior rain gutter makes it possible to use the greenhouse for water collection.
  • Twin-walled roof panels are sturdy and help block UV rays.
  • Perfect for small spaces like balconies.

Cons:

  • A few customers felt that the instructions were missing some steps that would have made installation easier.

What to Consider When Buying a Greenhouse for Colorado

Temperature Stability

Because the weather and temperatures can vary so much based on which part of the state you’re in, your greenhouse needs to be stable inside. Ideally, the greenhouse should form a consistent setting for your plants to grow in.

Insulation is a must in this regard. Some greenhouses will have frames designed to help with insulation, or seals around doors and windows to keep cold or warm air from seeping in.

Keeping it warm isn’t all you need to be concerned about, though. You also need to prepare for the possibility of your greenhouse getting too hot.

The easiest way to help prevent that possibility is by putting your greenhouse in a shady spot. However, having vents or even shade cloths can help even further.

Wind Rating

In some parts of Colorado, tornadoes and ferocious storms are another possibility you’ll need to prepare for. This is why some greenhouses are rated for wind.

The higher a wind rating, the greater the wind speed your greenhouse can withstand. We specifically looked for greenhouses with a high wind rating for a lot of the greenhouses on this list.

But if you’re looking elsewhere, make sure you pay attention to the wind rating. Most of the time, you can find this in the product description.

Roof Weight Capacity

During colder months, snowstorms can happen in Colorado. This is particularly true if you live at a high altitude, where temperatures can get freezing.

For that reason, many greenhouses will list how much snow their roof can hold. This can be an important quality to look at if it’s listed.

Otherwise, you can factor in the shape of the greenhouse. Bell-shaped or arched greenhouses, like a couple on this list, tend to not be able to hold snow on top, as it slides right down the sides.

Read Also: How Do You Keep Plants Alive in a Greenhouse in the Winter?

Ease of Assembly

You probably don’t want to spend days just putting together your greenhouse once it arrives. More likely than not, you want to be able to use it as soon as possible, especially since they can be costly.

This why it’s important to read about the assembly for each greenhouse. You’ll usually find a little information on this in the description.

One thing to look at is the tools that are required for assembly. Obviously, if a greenhouse doesn’t need a lot of tools, it won’t be as complex to set up.

Another place to look, though, is at comments from other buyers. Most will mention if there was some kind of difficulty putting the greenhouse together.

Wrap Up

If we had to choose one greenhouse for a Colorado gardener, we’d suggest the Riga Greenhouse. It has so many design elements that give it the strength it needs for extreme weather.

Its bell shape prevents snow from piling on top. But even if snow were gathered on top of it, can hold up to 180 pounds of snow, anyway.

The materials used to make it are resistant to UV rays, rot, and mildew. You can anticipate it to stand in your yard for years for come.

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